Ringturm

Image of the construction of the Ringturm
@ Archiv Boltenstern

Headquarters with history

„This is not America; this is Austria…” is how the newsreel “Austria Wochenschau” introduced its 14 June 1955 coverage of the Ringturm building’s grand opening. This building which today houses the holding company Vienna Insurance Group, its main shareholder Wiener Städtische Versicherungsverein and Wiener Städtische. was Austria’s first tall office building and a milestone of so called moderate modern architecture in Austria. Following years of war and occupation, however, it was also a symbol of Austria’s newly won freedom and economic rebirth. 

In 1952, Wiener Städtische General Manager Norbert Liebermann decided to have a new main headquarters put up for the company. Liebermann had spent the National Socialist period in the United States, where he had come to know and value the utility of modern office buildings. Since the lot made available to the company by the City of Vienna was rather small in terms of its area, Wiener Städtische was quick to reach a clear decision: “We are going to build a high rise.”

The Ringturm is still a prominent landmark in the heart of Vienna. It is both a workplace and an intercultural meeting point. Since 1998 the lobby has been home to the internationally acclaimed "Architektur im Ringturm" exhibition series, which showcases architecture from Austria and the CEE region. Admission is free of charge.

The top floor offers panoramic, 360° views of Vienna, making it a highly attractive and sought-after venue for all kinds of events – from high-level panel discussions and book launches to get-togethers for the worlds of politics, business and culture.

Technical data:

Height:
73,05 meter
20 floors above ground
three basement levels

Sway at maximum wind speed:
Lateral: 2,3 centimetre
Longitudinal: 2,0 centimetre 

Construction:
reinforced steel skeleton 

Construction period:
6 February 1953 - 11 June 1955

Architect:
Erich Boltenstern

 

Ringturm: work of art

The facade of the Ringturm has been converted into a giant art work for nine times already. The building is enveloped in around 4,000m² of printed netting sheets for four months every year.

Summer 2016: "Unburdened" by Ivan Exner
Summer 2015: "The Joys of Summer" by Tanja Deman
Summer 2014: "Veil of Agnes" by Arnulf Rainer
Summer 2013: "Ties" by Dorota Sadovská
Summer 2012: "Society" by László Fehér
Summer 2011: "A sence of Family" by Xenia Hausner
Summer 2008: "Tower in blossom" von Hubert Schmalix
Summer 2007: "Tower of life" by Robert Hammerstiel
Summer 2006: "Don Giovanni House" by Christian Ludwig Attersee

Weather light

The roof of the Ringturm features a weather mast, which is linked to the computer system of the Central Institute of Meteorology and Geodynamics at the Hohe Warte. Based on the prevailing conditions and data available for the next day, the 20-meter high mast displays a weather forecast for Vienna by means of 117 lights.  

The image shows the meaning of the weather lights. Red upwards means the temperature is rising. Red downwards means the temperature is fall